Friday, 13 December 2019 10:08

Campbelltown junglefies and deep dives into heat

Mayor Cr George Brticevic from Campbelltown City Council and Dr Sebastian Pfautsch, Research Theme Fellow - Environmental Sustainability at Western Sydney University launch the new heat sensor project. Mayor Cr George Brticevic from Campbelltown City Council and Dr Sebastian Pfautsch, Research Theme Fellow - Environmental Sustainability at Western Sydney University launch the new heat sensor project. Western Sydney University

 Campbelltown City Council will be embarking on a number of exciting projects over Summer 2019/2020.

 

Microclimate deep dive

During the summer of 2018-2019 Campbelltown City Council, in partnership with Western Sydney University (WSU), undertook a project titled ‘Data collection of the outdoor thermal environment’. The project involved the distribution of 110 temperature sensors at 2km intervals in and around the LGA.

The sensors were active between 1 December 2018 and 15 March 2019, and collected more than 1.46 million individual measurements.

Analysis of the measurements revealed that Campbelltown’s communities are exposed to extreme summer heat much more frequently than currently reported and expected.

In light of the findings, Campbelltown City Council, in partnership with Western Sydney University, has commenced a second project, titled ‘Microclimate Deep Dive’, which seeks to further explore the results in order to understand the complexities of heat in specific suburbs and across the LGA, and to propose directions, interventions and policies in response.

Specifically, the project will analyse the composition, within a 50-meter radius, of each of the 102 sensor locations or “microclimates” (e.g. percentage of location which is tree canopy cover, percentage which is building) to investigate the influence of landforms and materials on heat.

This knowledge will enable Council to develop a range of evidence-based guidelines to improve development standards for heat mitigation.

 

Campbelltown Station breathing wall

Campbelltown City Council in partnership with Junglefy and the University Technology, Sydney (UTS), will deliver a breathing wall with real time environmental monitoring at Campbelltown Station in February 2020.

A breathing wall is a wall made of a series of modular panels consisting of plants. Research undertaken by the UTS identifies that breathing walls:

  • increase urban cooling
  • improve air quality
  • improve noise attenuation
  • promote public amenity and pride of place
  • promote habitat to support biodiversity
  • increase property value.

The breathing wall will cover a total of 40m2, and will be distributed on both sides of the Hurley Street tunnel entrance, creating a green and vibrant entrance to the City.

In addition, environmental sensors will be installed in the area prior to the installation of the breathing wall to capture baseline environmental conditions, including air quality and air temperature. Following the installation of the breathing wall, sensors will be installed permanently to provide ongoing real-time information, which will be analysed and presented by the UTS.

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 17 December 2019 09:57